DNA Results for Joe M. Newton

 

©Joe M. Newton

 

Y-Chromosome DNA analysis

Haplogroup: R-CTS7325

(M207+ M173+ M343+ P25+ M269+ P312+ U152+ S47+[R1b1a2a1a2b3b])

DYS#
DYS#
DYS#
DYS#
DYS393
13
DYS390
24
DYS19
14
DYS391
10
DYS385a
11
DYS385b
14
DYS426
12
DYS388
12
DYS439
11
DYS389I
13
DYS392
15
DYS389II
29
DYS458
18
DYS459a
9
DYS459a
10
DYS455
10
DYS454
12
DYS447
25
DYS437
15
DYS448
19
DYS449
30
DYS464a
15
DYS464b
15
DYS464c
17
DYS464d
17
DYS460
11
Y-GATA-H4
11
YCAIIa
20
YCAIIb
23
DYS456
15
DYS607
15
DYS576
18
DYS570
18
CDYa
36
CDYb
39
DYS442
12
DYS438
12
DYS531
11
DYS578
9
DYF395S1a
15
DYF395S1b
16
DYS590
8
DYS537
10
DYS641
10
DYS472
8
DYF406S1
10
DYS511
10
DYS425
12
DYS413a
23
DYS413b
23
DYS557
16
DYS594
10
DYS436
12
DYS490
12
DYS534
14
DYS450
8
DYS444
12
DYS481
22
DYS520
20
DYS446
12
DYS617
12
DYS568
11
DYS487
14
DYS572
11
DYS640
11
DYS492
13
DYS565
12
DYS710
36
DYS485
15
DYS632
9
DYS495
16
DYS540
12
DYS714
26
DYS716
26
DYS717
19
DYS505
12
DYS556
11
DYS549
13
DYS589
12
DYS522
11
DYS494
9
DYS533
11
DYS636
12
DYS575
10
DYS638
11
DYS462
11
DYS452
30
DYS445
12
Y-GATA-A10
13
DYS463
24
DYS441
13
Y-GGAAT-1B07
10
DYS525
11
DYS712
22
DYS593
15
DYS650
23
DYS532
10
DYS715
23
DYS504
17
DYS513
12
DYS561
15
DYS552
25
DYS726
12
DYS635
23
DYS587
18
DYS643
10
DYS497
15
DYS510
17
DYS434
9
DYS461
13
DYS435
11
Haplogroup
R-CTS7325

From a review of this DNA Y chromosome data you will see that DYS#392 has a value of 15. Current data extracted from the YHRD database in Berlin indicates that this value is rare and appears to have originated in the Eastern part of Germany or Northern part of Italy. The database shows the sequence to be most prevalent in the following four areas:

Greifswald, Germany (north coast of Germany)
Leipzig, Germany (just south of Berlin, Germany)
Liguria, Italy (on the border between Switzerland and Italy)
Lombardy, Italy (north coast of Italy)

If you look at the map of Europe shown below, you will see a brown line that approximately connects these four areas. The southern end of this line stops on the coast of Italy (Liguria) while the northern end stops at the Baltic Sea town of Greufswald.

 

 

Prosapia Genetics Remix and Geographic Population Structure Analysis

Prosapia Genetics Geographic Population Structure (GPS) algorithm is a biogeographic tool that analyzes a person's autosomal DNA data and predicts the most likely geographical origin for that person. GPS finds a point of origin for an individual, such as a village, town or country, where their DNA was formed by combination of several gene pools from populations coming together and creating a genetic line that would eventually lead to the individual being analyzed. Historic examples of such population mixing events in Europe are most commonly found in the early Middle Ages. One such example is the Viking migration from Northern Germany to Scandinavia and subsequently to England. In each of these migration steps the migrants mixed with the local population and, as a result, their Germanic DNA signature changed to a Scandinavian-Germanic signature. The more and longer time the Vikings mixed with the locals the faster their German DNA signature decayed. When they moved to England and again mixed with the locals, their DNA signature changed again. So, if you are British of Viking descent, the place where your DNA was last mixed may be England or Scandinavia, dependent on your ancestors' history. This is the place that GPS finds. The specific timing of the most recent population mixing event for each individual may of course be different. We conservatively estimate that for most European populations the upper time limit for such events that we can still trace is about 1000 years ago.

They have a second algorithm Prosapia uses is called Remix. It is a computational tool that finds matches between the sequence of a person's autosomal DNA and DNA sequence markers that are typically observed in various ethnic and national groups. Remix reports the best matches with percentage figures that indicate the quality of each match. The results of both these test on my DNA are shown in the two following figures.

 

 

mtDNA analysis for Joe M. Newton

 

mtDNA Haplogroup K1a4d

HVR1 differences from CRS     162 24C, 16311C, 16519C

HVR2 differences from CRS     73G, 263G, 315.1C, 4 97T, 524.1C, 524.2A

Mitochondria are present in all human cells and contain their own DNA. Both males and females have this mtDNA, but only females pass it on to their offspring. Therefore, mtDNA is passed from mother to daughter along the female line without any influence from fathers. Therefore, since human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is inherited only from the mother, it has distinct properties that make it an invaluable tool for genealogical and anthropological study. Because of this, the study of mtDNA is essentially the study of female genetic lines within human populations. Any mutations, of the base DNA sequence, are passed down to the children from the mother. Over time many mutations will occur, forming a detailed record of the maternal line in which it is a part. When this mtDNA record is studied in combination with other historical data, a particular mutation sequence can also be associated with a geographic area and population. This ability to connect mutations with places and populations has allowed researchers to constructed ancient migration patterns.

MtDNA analysis is performed by looking for both similarities and differences among individuals. In general, many DNA base pairs are analyzed and always includes the entire HVR-1 (HyperVariable Region 1) area, but many times also include the HVR-2 area. A base pair is a specific component of the DNA and is made of adenine (A) and guanine (G) or cytosine (C) and thymine (T). The HVR-1 area is mostly commonly analyzed because mutations occur more frequently in this region, which make the differentiation of specific lineages more easily. However, despite the fact that the HVR-1 region experiences mutations more frequently, the mutations do not occur often enough to determine whether two individuals are either closely or distantly related. Testing the HVR-2 area provides addition information that can assist in the determination of how closely two people are related.  In general, if two people share identical HVR-1 results, they have a 50% chance of being related in 56 generations (about 1,500 years).  However, with a match in both the HVR-1 and HVR-2 areas, the 50% chance of being related is reduced to 28 generation (about 700 years).  W hile the time frame for a common ancestor point is long, it is important to remember that if two people match, they do share a common female ancestor!

Research over the last decade suggests that all the maternal lines ultimately originate from Mitochondrial Eve approximately 140,000 years ago in Africa. However, my mtDNA sequence can be traced to a much more recent female who most likely lived in Northern Italy some 14,000 years ago.

 

Native Population Matches for Joe M. Newton

 

The data shown in the following table represents how my DNA matches Native Populations. These results are my Top 20 matches in a database of 808 native populations that have experienced minimal movement and admixture in modern history (approximately, the last 500 years). Individual matches do not necessarily indicate recent social or cultural affiliation with a particular ethnicity. Instead, the Native Population Match results identify populations where my DNA is most common, reflecting my deep ancestral origins. For people of multiple family origins, these matches can also identify populations where similar combinations of genetic material have taken place.

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